Featured Papers

done_all Agricultural Sciences

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    EFFECT OF DIFFERENT RATES OF INSECTICIDE AND FUNGICIDE COMBINATIONS ON THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF WATERMELON (CITRULLUS LUNATUS) IN ENUGU AREA, SOUTHEASTERN NIGERIA.

  • person_outlineAuthor(s): Awere S.U, Omeje T.E
  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time24 September, 2019
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    The experiment to evaluate the effect of insecticide (chilli pepper aqueous extract) and fungicide (carbendazim 12% W.P. + Mancozeb 63% W.P.) combinations on the growth and yield of watermelon (citrullus lunatus) in Enugu area southeastern  Nigeria was conducted during the 2016 cropping season. The research was carried out at the faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources Management Teaching and Research Farm of Enugu State University of Science and Technology Enugu, Southeastern Nigeria. The experimental design was 3x2 factorial in a randomized complete block (RCB) replicated three (3) times, using “crimson sweet” watermelon as a test crop. Parameters measured were days to 50% flowering, vine length (cm) number of fruits per plant, number of marketable fruits per plants, number of rotten fruits per plant and fruit yield (tonha‑1). The result of the experiment showed a significant (P = 0.05) interaction effect of insecticide (Chilli Pepper aqueous extract) and fungicide (Carbendazim 12% W.P. + Mancozeb 63% W.P.) combinations on all the parameters measured except on the number of fruits per plant.

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    ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI COMMUNITIES AND ROOT COLONIZATION OF CROPS IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF A CONTINUOUS AND CROP ROTATION CROPPING SYSTEM IN DERIVED SAVANNAH, NIGERIA

  • person_outlineAuthor(s): Adeyemi NO, Atayese MO, Olubode AA
  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time24 September, 2019
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    The evaluation of the effects of cropping practices on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in soil is of great importance in sustainable agriculture. This study investigated the spore density, root colonization and composition of native AMF in soils under two different cropping systems (continuous cropping and crop rotation) in a derived Savannah, Nigeria. Rhizosphere soils and root samples were collected from five fields to assessed AMF spores density and root colonization. The spore density and root colonization was highest in field plot under crop rotation practice (273.3 spores per 50 g dry soil and 82.7 respectively). Maize and soybean cultivation significantly produced higher spore density and root colonization compared to sesame and sunflower. AMF spores of Glomus, Gigaspora, Acaulospora, and Scutellospora species were identified based on morphological characteristics. Glomus specie was the most dominant genus in soils with highest rela­tive abundance of 68.7% followed by Acaulospora (19.8%) and Scutellospora (13.5%), with lowest relative abundance of AM spores observed for Gigaspora (5.6%) and unknown genera (2.5%). The results contribute to a better understanding of AMF composition as influenced by the cropping practices and host plants, and could be valuable in regulating the AMF community structure, and providing a primary basis for sustainable crop production.

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    Field Loss Estimation Of A Developed Rice Stripper Harvester In Nigeria

  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time19 December, 2018
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    Reduction in post harvest losses must inevitably start with minimizing losses during harvesting. So far, grain stripping harvester is a technology which is being developed and is becoming effective for rice and wheat harvesting. Grain losses in stripping harvester occur at the gathering/stripping operation which are shattering, stubble and lodging losses. The harvest loss estimation of rice harvesting with a self propelled grain stripper developed in Nigeria was carried out. At best machine settings, determined were critical operating parameters to obtain total minimum harvest loss estimation which was 13.5% of the total yield while the manual harvesting loss was 20.3% under the same condition. The machine setting at this combination was rotor height of 270.0 mm, peripheral rotor speed of 670.0 rpm and forward speed was 3.0 km/h which gave shattering loss as 5.5%, stubble loss was 4.9% and lodging loss was 3.1% of the total yield. It was found that planting pure seed variety will reduce stripper header losses at harvest because it will result in uniform crop height at maturity which was one of the design factors that affected the harvester performance on the field. Keywords:Estimation, field loss, stripper, rice, developed

  • library_books

    EFFECTS OF BLENDED FERTILIZERS ON LEAF NUTRIENTS CONTENT OF MATURE CLONAL TEA IN KENYA

  • person_outlineAuthor(s): Sitienei K, Kamiri H.W, Nduru G.M, Kamau D.N.
  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time27 June, 2018
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    Fertilizer studies in Kenya tea industry have focused predominantly on compound NPK. These fertilizers cannot be easily manipulated for specific soils and tea clones. In this respect, Athi River Mining limited has produced Mavuno blended NPK fertilizers with calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg). However, their application rates that would result in optimal nutrients uptake are lacking. This is the knowledge gap that this study sought to address. Therefore, the fertilizer blends were assessed for their effects on nutrients uptake at different rate in two sites. The sites were selected purposefully, one in the eastern and the other in the western tea growing areas. Randomized complete block design (RCBD) were used to select 36 trial plots in the two areas which were treated with three fertilizer types where one type was control, and four fertilizer application rates with one rate being a control. The trial was replicated three times. Leaf samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients content. The data were then subjected to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) using Mstat C computer software package. Two leaves and a bud had higher nitrogen content (Timbilil 4.84%; Kagochi 4.53%) compared to deficient levels in mature leaf (Timbilil 2.26%; Kagochi 2.95%). This study has shown that supplementing the soil applied NPK fertilizers with calcium, magnesium and micronutrients resulted in better nutrients uptake.

  • library_books

    FH-326: A DROUGHT TOLERANT, HIGH YIELDING VARIETY FOR WATER SCARCE AREAS OF PUNJAB, PAKISTAN

  • person_outlineAuthor(s): RIAZ M, FAROOQ J, KAINTH RA, AYOUB M, AHMED S, AKRAM HM
  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time20 December, 2017
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    ‘FH-326’ cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) was developed by the Cotton Research Station (CRS), Faisalabad, Pakistan, and approved by Punjab Seed Council in 48th meeting on 06-03-2017. This variety developed as a part of investigations oriented towards evolving high-yielding cotton cultivars that can tolerate drought stress.FH-326 was developed through making the cross between FH-942 (Non-Bt.) and FH-114 (Bt.). FH-326 was tested in multiple trials conducted by various public agencies. In Provincial Coordinated Cotton Trial (PCCT) FH-326 out yielded (more than 35%) significantly to both standards FH-142 and MNH-886. In the National Coordinated Varietal Trial (NCVT), FH-326 produced more Seed Cotton Yield than the standards for two consecutive years (2016 and 2017). FH-326 is highly drought tolerant variety (Required 4 irrigation instead of 8 after germination) and also possesses high fiber quality (staple length 29.2 mm and fiber fineness 4.2 µg/inch). The commercial cultivation of this variety will contribute sustainability of cotton production in Pakistan and can also be used as valuable genetic resource in future cotton breeding programs.

  • library_books

    EFFECT OF SPACING AND NPK 20:10:10 FERTILIZER ON THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF WATER MELON (CITRULLUS LANATUS) IN ENUGU, SOUTH EASTERN NIGERIA.

  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time26 November, 2016
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    A field experiment to investigate the effect of spacing and NPK 20:10:10 fertilizer on the growth and yield of watermelon was conducted at the teaching and Research Farm of Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources Management, Enugu State University of Science and Technology. The experiment was carried out in a 2 x 3 factorial in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with six (6) treatments replicated three (3) times using “crimson sweet” as a test crop. Parameters measured were vine length, number of fruits per plant, days to 50% flowering, fruit yield (ton/ha), and number of marketable fruits. 400kg/ha fertilizer in spacing 30cm x 30cm plots recorded the highest vine length of 193.8 cm which significantly deferred from the other treatment means. This was followed by 200kg/ha fertilizer in spacing of 30 cm x 30 cm which recorded vine length of 151.50 cm that significantly deferred from the rest of the treatment means. There were no significant differences between 400kg/ha fertilizer in 15 cm x 15 cm plots and 200kg/ha fertilizer in 15 cm x 15cm plots, O kg/ha fertilizer in 30 cm x 30 cm pots and O kg/ha fertilizer in 15cm x 15 cm plots on vine length. 400kg/ha fertilizer in 30 cm x 30 cm plots recorded the highest mean number of 34.33 fruits per plant which deferred significantly from the rest of the treatment means. The following treatments produced the same effects on the number of fruits per plant – 200kg/ha fertilizer in 30 cm x 30 cm plots and 400kg/ha fertilizer in 15 cm x 15 cm plots, O kg/ha fertilizer in 30 cm x 30 cm plots and O kg/ha fertilizer in 1 5cm x 15cm plots. On fruit yield (ton/ha) 400kg/ha fertilizer in 30cm x 30cm plots, and 200kg/ha fertilizer in 30 cm x 30 cm plots produced the highest yield of 13.44 ton/ha and 13.22 ton/ha respectively which were not significantly different except the controls – O kg/ha fertilizer in 15cm x 15cm and O kg/ha fertilizer in 30 cm x 30 cm plots which yielded 3.89 ton/ha and 5.48 ton/ha respectively. 400kg/ha fertilizer in 30cm x 30cm, 400kg/ha fertilizer in 15cm x 15cm, 200kg/ha fertilizer in 30cm x 30cm and 200kg/ha fertilizer in 15cm x 15cm plots recorded mean number of 9.33, 9.00, 7.00 and 8.33 marketable fruits per plant respectively which were significantly the same except the controls. There was no treatment effect on the number of days to 50% flowering. There was no interaction (AB) effect on vine length (cm) between NPK 20:10:10 and spacing. Also, there was no interaction effect between NPK 20:10:10 and spacing on the number of fruits per plant. There was a significant interaction effect between NPK 20:10:10 and spacing on the fruit yield (ton/ha), so also on the number of marketable fruits. There was no interaction effect between NPK 20:10:10 and spacing on the number of days to 50% flowering.

  • library_books

    EFFECTS OF SEASON ON WEIGHT GAIN BY HONEYBEE HIVE (APIS MELLIFERA)

  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time24 November, 2016
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    Five honeybee hives already colonized by honeybee were used in the study aimed at evaluating the effect of seasons of the year on weight gain by honeybee hive. The weight of these hives were reduced (by partial harvesting) to an average initial weight of 2.76kg the night preceding the experiment (30th of April, 2007) for seasons \'\'A\'\'. On the night of the last day of October the hives were weighed with the average weight gain for the hives standing at 6.27kg. This represents the initial weight of the hives for season “B”. Season “C” initial average weight was 13.13kg. The average weight of the beehives at the end of the season was 17.26kg. The average daily weight gain for each season was determined by dividing the weight gain for each season by the number of days (the observation lasted for). That is 184 days for season “A”, 92 days for season “B” and 89 days for “C”. The wet and dry bulbs thermometers were used in determining the micro-temperature and relative humidity. The micro-climatic readings were taken three times daily (6am, 12pm and 6pm) during the observation. The number of honeybees leaving and returning to the hives were observed and recorded. The study showed a significant difference (p<0.05) in terms of final weight gain and average daily weight gain in favour of “B”. The study also demonstrated that temperature and relative humidity affect honeybee foraging. Honeybee foraging affects weight gain.

  • library_books

    DETERMINATION OF THE EFFICACY OF BEST ACTION, FURADAN, AND NEEM EMULSION IN THE CONTROL OF MAJOR INSECT PESTS OF COWPEA [Vigna unguiculata (L.) WALP]

  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time24 November, 2016
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    Field experiments to determine the efficacy of Best Action (30g/litre cypermethrine plus 250g/litre dimethoate) as water emulsifiable concentrates, Furadan 10G (carbofuran), Neem emulsion (Azadiracta indica) as insecticide treatments in the control of major insect pests of cowpea were conducted in two agro-environments simultaneously in Enugu Area, South Eastern Nigeria in 2014 cropping season using two cowpea varieties (Ife brown, and Potiskum) as test crops. The experimental design was a split plot in a randomized compete block (RCB) replicated three times. Best Action was more effective in controlling cowpea insect pests, followed by Furandan 10G, and Neem emulsion respectively and their effectiveness was not affected by climatic factors variations in the two agro-environments (Nsukka and Agbani). Ife brown and Potiskum did not significantly resist the attack of major insect pests of cowpea. Insecticides and cowpea varieties did not have a significant interaction effect on the control of major insect pests of cowpea.

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    Establishment, Growth and Biomass yield of three Grass species on a degraded Ultisol and their effect on soil loss.

  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time22 November, 2016
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    Erosion is a cause for concern; this is because of its effects on the soil used for both agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Experiments were carried out to check the establishment, growth and biomass field of 3 tropical plants and their effects on soil loss during 2007 planting season. The treatments comprised 3 grasses viz. Azonopus compressus. Panicum maximum and Andropogon gayanus. The grasses were laid our in the field using a randomized complete block design replicated 4 times. Bare soil was used as the control. The parameters tested were plant height, leaf area index, root density, root establishment and the amount of soil loss using erosion pins. The result showed that Andropogon gayanus has an edge over Panicum maximum and Axonopus compressus with reference to plant height, root establishment, root density and leaf area index. Andropogon gayanus had a higher plant height from 3,6,9 and 12WAP with plant heights of 3.30cm, 3.63cm,3.93cm and 4.30cm representing 15.7%, 19.3% and 28.8% respectively. It was followed by P. maximum while A. compressus maintained the lowest plant height from 3,6,9 and 12 WAP with plant height of 2.83cm, 3.05cm, 3.20cm and 3.45cm respectively. In terms of root density, A. compressus did not have much root density which was 0.02t/ha, also at 12WAP, P. maximum did not have much root density which was 0.06t/ha though it was higher than A. compressus. The trend was the same for A. gayanus whose root density was 0.75t/ha. In terms of leaf area index (LAI), it was shown that at 3WAP and 6WAP, A. compressus had the lowest leaf area index of 58.25 and 65.75 respectively. Also at 9WAP and 12WAP A. compressus had 72.28 and 75.08t/ha respectively. At 3WAP and 6WAP P.maximum had a high leaf area index of 66.60 and 77.25 respectively. A. gayanus at 3WAP and 6WAP had 87.73 gayanus at 3WAP and 6WAP had 87.73 and 90.80 for 9WAP and 12WAP respectively. A. compressus protected the soil, reducing soil loss as a total of 9.43(t/ha) was noticed at 12WAP, while for P. maximum and A. gayanus, 139.34(t/ha) and 139.43(t/ha) were noticed from these grasses respectively hence A. compressis has an edge in reducing the amount of soil loss hence has high protective capacity over the soil.

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    Influence of Biochar on soil Properties, Growth and Yield of Maize (Zea mays L).

  • subjectCategory: Agricultural Sciences
  • access_time22 November, 2016
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    An experiment was carried out at the Teaching and Research farm of the Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources Management, Enugu State University of Science and Technology Enugu, to find out the effect of biochar on soil properties and maize yield in 2012 academic session. Four rates namely o (control), 1.5kg, 2kg and 3kg/ ha rates of biochar were used for the study that was arranged as a randomized complete block. The treatment was replicated 5 times. Result indicated that 3kg and 2kg/plot of biochar rate produced significantly higher growth and yield of maize (0.33& 0.26 t/ha) than 1.5kg and 0kg/plot of biochar rates. Result also indicated that biochar significantly increase soil exchangeable base (52%) and acidity (pH 4.62).

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